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Photo Size/Resolution Question

 
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Rick Miller
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 5:03 pm    Post subject: Photo Size/Resolution Question Reply with quote

Hello,
I searched for some topics on this, and found some answers, but am still a little confused. Maybe someone can help:

I have a folder full of images. They are all different resolutions and sizes. One may be an image I scanned in at 300dpi, 2 inches wide by 3 inches high. Another is 72dpi 4x6, another 300dpi, 5x7.

Now, they all seem to import into any style. However, in some of the styles, the top, bottom, left, or right of the images are cut off. In other styles, they are fine. In the styles there is a problem, in some of them, there is a picture adjust option, which usually helps, but in others, there isn't.

For the one's that I cannot seem to bypass this cutoff problem, what can I do? Do I have to resize in Photoshop? If so, how do I know what size to resize to? Does it depend on each individual style?

Thanks for any help.
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rsnow
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2005 4:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Others may jump in with more and better info but as I recall each style has information about what the style does and recommended photo size. I think the icon for this is the one that looks like a briefcase.

If you need to resize you can do it in Photoshop or you can do it in the edit section of CS. Also, some styles have options to trim to fit, etc.

In some instances, folks have used a technique of placing an image of a certain size on a larger background to insure that the whole image appears and the background is what gets cut off. This usually requires some experimentation until you get to know how a particular style works.

I know it can be frustrating at first and especially when you are trying to complete a project, but the more you experiment with CS and the more you learn as you go along, you will be able to use new ideas to create some remarkable effects.
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nan
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2005 5:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In simple words, use protrait photos for protrait shape/paper/frame, landscape photo for landscape shape/paper/frame, sqaure photo for sqaure shape/paper/frame.

Some styles may adjust the shape/paper/frame to fit the aspect ratio of the photo. But not all styles do this. Some styles has shape/paper/frame in a fixed aspect ratio and you have to crop photo into the same aspect ratio, no matter what DPI, size or resolution it has.
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Bill Smith
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2005 9:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don't spend too much time worrying about 300 dpi for 2inch x 3 inch and 72 dpi for 4x6, etc. For computer monitor displays, such as 3D-Album, all you really need to look at is the pixel dimensions. Pixel dimensions is dpi times width x dpi times heigth. So your 300 dpi for 2x3 would be 600x900 pixels. A full size 13inch monitor will display about 1024x768 pixels. Most of the styles in 3D-Album use a smaller display area - so often 512x384 or even a 600x450 so will work fine for landscape pictures. If the style is looking for portrait orientation, then reverse the numbers.

If you're working with photographs (like film that is scanned or processed to CD) then the dimensions will be more like the 2x3 then a digital camera. So, instead of a 600x450 you'll be looking at something like 600x400.

Your images don't have to be exactly the dimensions above - the program/PC can adjust automatically. I often use 1024x768 for everything - even though most styles could work with images half that size (or smaller).

For more information on cropping/resizing just do a SEARCH on "crop". You'll find several postings. Here are two of them: http://www.3d-album.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1192 and http://www.3d-album.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1244.
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fortemac
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2005 3:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also, you don't need another program to fix your photos to be able to use them in any style. Just go to the tab that says Edit, fix your photo as square or whatever, and save it to a different name so you won't hurt your original.
Cyndy
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Rick Miller
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 13, 2005 2:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for all these suggestions. Gonna try them all come Monday back at the office.

One question for Bill Smith regarding not worrying about the 300dpi vs. the 72dpi photos: when i did my test, i scanned the same photo twice, once at 72dpi and once at 300dpi. I then placed both in one of the styles that pans or zooms in and makes it pretty big. I noticed that the 300dpi looked a lot better, from the higher dpi, correct?

If this is the case, shouldn't I then have to worry about the dpi, or am I confused again. Thanks.
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nan
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 13, 2005 9:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Only the number of pixels (dots) count. DPI, dots per inch, is used to decide how many pixels should be displayed or sampled within a square inch. This information is usualy used by printers and scanners. But 3D-Album animation does not take this information. It only counts how many pixels in your image.

When you scan a picture, DPI is a critical factor to determine how many pixels you will get. For example, to scan a 1'x1' square photo, if you set the dpi to 300, you'll get 300x300 pixels.

Pan and Zoom style can be used to zoom in on a very small area to show the detail of an image. Images with more pixels contain more details and will be displayed better in this style.

DPI is used only when a physical image size is involved. In applications you do not care about the absolute physical size (inches), DPI is useless.
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Bill Smith
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2005 12:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think NAN explained it very well.

DPI is really important in scanning and in printing. But, when it comes to 3D-album and your computer monitor displays - the only thing that matters is the pixel size.

If you scan a 1x1 inch photo at 300 dpi, you will get 300x300 pixels.

If you scan a 1.5 x 1.5 inch photo at 200 dpi, you will get 300 x 300 pixels.

Both of the above photos will take the same amount of "space" on your computer monitor. And, both photos will appear much bigger then the origial 1 x 1 or 1.5 x 1.5. If you have a 72 dpi monitor, then your 300 pixel width and heigth will be close to 4 inches (I'm not going to do the math). In actual fact, I think the 72 dpi was for macintosh machines, and the IBM/microsoft computers may actuallly use something closer to 96 dpi. I'm not really knowledgeable in this area, so I could be wrong.

Anyway, this is why I say not to worry about the dpi, but only worry about the pixel size of the images.
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